Collaborations - Studio Sessions


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Table of Contents

Overview

Through Bruce's entire career he collaborated on many other artists albums.

Here we try to present a full historical overview of other artists songs on which Bruce can be heard by voice or instrument.

Please be aware that this page is a work-in-progress and is not yet close to complete.

Released

These are the songs that Bruce collaborated on, sorted by the year the studio session for it took place, which does not have to be the same as the year of release. Next order is simply alphabetically on the song-title.

# Song Title Running Time Release
1976 THE FEVER 4:45 GUEST: I DON'T WANT TO GO HOME
1976 YOU MEAN SO MUCH TO ME 3:39 GUEST: I DON'T WANT TO GO HOME
1977 WHEN YOU DANCE 5:22 GUEST: REAL
1977 LITTLE GIRL SO FINE 3:40 GUEST: REAL
1977 LOVE ON THE WRONG SIDE OF TOWN 3:05 GUEST: REAL
1978 HEARTS OF STONE 4:27 GUEST: HEARTS OF STONE
1978 TALK TO ME 3:56 GUEST: HEARTS OF STONE
1978 TRAPPED AGAIN 4:14 GUEST: HEARTS OF STONE
1978 STREET HASSLE 11:00 GUEST: HASSLE
1981 DEDICATION 3:11 GUEST: DEDICATION
1981 JOLÉ BLON 3:25 GUEST: DEDICATION
1981 THIS LITTLE GIRL 3:42 GUEST: DEDICATION
1981 YOUR LOVE 3:28 GUEST: DEDICATION
1982 ALL I NEED 5:10 GUEST: LINE
1982 ANGELYNE 4:03 GUEST: LINE
1982 CLUB SOUL CITY 3:36 GUEST: LINE
1982 HOLD ON (TO WHAT YOU GOT) 3:05 GUEST: LINE
1982 LOVE'S ON THE LINE 3:38 GUEST: LINE
1982 OUT OF WORK 2:53 GUEST: LINE
1982 RENDEZVOUS 2:41 GUEST: LINE
1985 SUN CITY 5:45 GUEST: SUNCITY / 1985 single
1993 HOMESTEAD 4:14 GUEST: BABYLON
1995 IDIOT'S DELIGHT 3:22 GUEST: HOME
1996 1945 5:12 GUEST: HOME
1996 CHEAP MOTEL 3:45 GUEST: HOME
1996 I'M NOT SLEEPING 3:56 GUEST: HOME
2017 THAT'S WHAT MAKES US GREAT 3:26 GUEST: YESTERDAYS / 2017 single

Details

1945 uncirculating
1945 5:12 GUEST: HOME

Note: Co-written by Springsteen and Joe Grushecky in July 1995, released by Grushecky on the album Coming Home, on February 10, 1998, without the presence of Bruce Springsteen. Unknown whether Springsteen recorded version exists.

ALL I NEED - V1 2:50 LM-7 / HNWB
ALL I NEED - V2 uncirculating

Note: V1 recorded at Springsteen's home in Colts Neck, NJ in late June 1981. Eventually given to Gary U.S. Bonds. V2 was recorded at Hit Factory in January or February 1982. Probably the same core recording as found on the US Bonds album (i.e. the E Street Band) – but with the Springsteen lead vocal. The song was soundchecked on July 8, 1981 at Brendan Byrne Arena, East Rutherford, NJ, a recording of which can be found on 'The Lost Masters Vol. V'.

ALL THE WAY HOME - V1 GUEST: BETTERDAYS
ALL THE WAY HOME - V2 DEVILS

Note: Written sometime in 1990 or early 1991. Springsteen donated the song to Southside Johnny and Bruce took part in the July 1991 recording session in New York that produced Southside's cover version. Bruce re-recorded the song in 2004 and released it on the Devils & Dust album.

ANGELYNE uncirculating

Note: Recorded at Power Station on February 1, 1980. Donated to Gary U.S. Bonds for his album On The Line, released in 1982. Bonds likely overdubbed his vocal onto an E Street backing track. A version with Springsteen's vocals was included on a 1993 in-house Tracks concept album. This is not the same song as "Oh Angelyne", a totally different track that eventually became "The River".

ANOTHER THIN LINE 5:01 GUEST: CARSON

Note: Written sometime between late 1997 and early 2000. There remains some confusion whether "Another Thin Line" is a writing collaboration with Joe Grushecky, or if it was composed entirely by Springsteen. Springsteen premiered the song live on June 22, 2000. He then prefaced another performance of the song on June 29 by commenting, "here's something I wrote with Joe Grushecky." However, a publishing registration, as well as the official US Copyright filing (July 21, 2000) lists the song as a Springsteen-only composition. Still, descriptions of the song, including the one on grushecky.com, say it is a Grushecky-Springsteen songwriting collaboration. A studio duet between Springsteen and Grushecky was released on Grushecky's East Carson Street in 2009.

BECAUSE THE NIGHT (Belongs To Lovers) - V1 3:17 DO-3 / UP / AM
BECAUSE THE NIGHT - V2 - fade in 2:32 LM-3 / UP / AM
BECAUSE THE NIGHT - V3 3:19 DO-2 / DDO / DDOC / ESR / O711S
BECAUSE THE NIGHT - V4 3:22 PROMISE / 2010 SINGLE

Note: First appeared on pre-Darkness sessions song list as "The Night Belongs To Lovers". V1, "Because The Night (Belongs To Lovers)", was recorded at Atlantic Studios, New York on June 1, 1977 with the lyrics not finished. The instrumental backing tracks were used on V4. V2 was recorded July 1, 1977 at Atlantic Studios, and is less embryonic but still with some unfinished lyrics. Springsteen cut his last take on September 27, 1977, V3. It is not clear if this was a demo for Patti Smith. The transfer of the song was orchestrated by Jimmy Iovine, who, in his own words, "was engineering Darkness and producing Easter at the same time. This is confirmed by Assistant Engineer Thom Panunzio, who sincerely claims that he was an assistant only on rare occasions, which is well known by Bruce, Jon and the band. According to Iovine, "Bruce was understanding and flexible, because he realized this was my first real break as a producer. Anyway, one night whilst we were lounging around the Hotel Navarro in New York, I told Bruce I desperately wanted a hit with Patti, that she deserved one. He agreed. As he had no immediate plans to put 'Because The Night' on an album, I said why not give it to Patti. Bruce replied, If she can do it, she can have it." Iovine brought Smith the September 27 demo of the song, and Patti added her own lyrics, recording it at the Record Plant for her album Easter, and scoring her first and biggest hit single. On December 30, 1977 at CBGB Second Avenue Theatre, New York City, NY, Patti Smith premiered her new song, with Bruce Springsteen on guitar and background vocals. With his own lyrics, Bruce played the song almost every night of the 1978 Darkness Tour. The officially released V4 uses Smith's lyrics, the June 1977 backing tracks, and a new vocal take, recorded June 25, 2010 in the Record Plant Studio truck parked on his Colts Neck, NJ property.

CAN'T TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS - V1 uncirculating
CAN'T TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS - V2 4:19 BACKIN20

Note: Gary U.S. Bonds and Laurie Anderson sent a tape of their composition "Can't Teach An Old Dog New Tricks" to Springsteen, requesting he contribute to Gary's album Back In 20. In response, Springsteen recorded guitar and vocal tracks in a Protools session on November 19, 2003, at Boxwood Studios, Colts Neck, NJ. The completed track, released June 1, 2004 on Back In 20, also featured harmonica by Southside Johnny Lyon.

CHEAP MOTEL uncirculating
CHEAP MOTEL 3:45 GUEST: HOME

Note: Co-written by Springsteen and Joe Grushecky in July 1995. Released by Grushecky on the album Coming Home, on February 10, 1998, without the presence of Bruce Springsteen. Unknown whether a Springsteen recorded version exists.

CLUB SOUL CITY - V1 0:55 FFOD / HNWB
CLUB SOUL CITY - V2 uncirculating

Note: V1 recorded at Springsteen's home in Colts Neck, NJ from mid-September to December 1981, short take of not much more than the title, repeated. V2 recorded at The Hit Factory in January or February 1982. Probably the same core recording as found on the Gary U.S. Bonds album (i.e. the E Street Band) – but with the Springsteen lead vocal. Known to have been soundchecked twice in 1992 (June 21 in Milan and July 25 in East Rutherford) but never performed live.

CODE OF SILENCE - V1 uncirculating
CODE OF SILENCE - V2 4:08 GUEST: GOODLIFE

Note: Co-written by Bruce Springsteen and [Grushecky] during December 1997 and January 1998. Springsteen premiered the song live on June 12, 2000 with the E Street Band, and another version recorded on June 29 was released on The Essential Bruce Springsteen in 2003. Bruce and Joe recorded a studio version together at Thrill Hill Recording, New Jersey, released on the Joe Grushecky album A Good Life in July 2006.

DARK AND BLOODY GROUND 5:39 GUEST: BABYLON

Note: Co-written by Springsteen and Joe Grushecky in 1994–95. Recorded by Bruce Springsteen, Joe Grushecky and The Houserockers at Thrill Hill Recording, Beverly Hills, March 1995 and released on Grushecky's album American Babylon in October 1995.

DEDICATION uncirculating

Note: "Dedication" was recorded at Power Station studios on December 4 and 6, 1979 during the River sessions and later donated to Gary U.S. Bonds as the title track for his 1981 album. According to comments by Bonds, Bruce brought him this song as something from the River sessions arsenal that Bruce felt suited Bonds's style. It seems likely that Bonds overdubbed his vocal onto the E Street Band backing.

FASTER AND LOUDER 2:48 GUEST: BLOODBROTHERS

On the heels of completing "Don't Look Back", "Candy's Room", "Darkness On the Edge of Town", and "The Factory Song" in the first half of March 1978, Springsteen could finally take a breather. In adjoining studio A at the Record Plant, New York proto-punk band The Dictators were working on their third album, Bloodbrothers. So when Bruce stopped by for a visit, one thing led to another, and he made another undocumented recording appearance, on the opening track, "Faster And Louder". Listen at the 2:10 mark, when Bruce counts the band back in preceding the final verse, "One! Two! One, two, three, four!" Dictators: "I can scream, faster and louder, I can jive faster and louder…Hot Pants! faster and louder." The "reigning king of street rock" and the "Bronx Bombers" (monickers assigned by rock critics of the day) seemed to feed off each other; for more details on Bruce and the Dictators, see the recording session listing.

GYPSY WOMAN - V1a 4:20 COMP: CURTIS
GYPSY WOMAN - V1b 3:28 BACK

Note: Written by Curtis Mayfield in 1961. Recorded by Bruce during September or October 1993 at Thrill Hill Recording, Beverly Hills, California. Co-produced by Springsteen and Tommy Sims. This features Bruce on lead vocals and guitars and Tommy Sims on bass, keyboards, percussion and background vocals. First released in February 1994 on the Curtis Mayfield tribute album.

HEARTS OF STONE - V1 5:32 SYMKB / DDO / DO-2 / LES / AM
HEARTS OF STONE - V2 4:29 TRACKS

Note: Originally titled "For Hearts Of Stone" before Darkness sessions began. No evidence of a recording session has been found until October 14, when a demo was cut for Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, along with "Talk To Me", and later handed to Steve Van Zandt on a cassette tape. There are obviously some dates to be found, judging by the performance of the band, and the complete lyrics. Steve was preparing to produce the Jukes' third album, and the two songs were Bruce's contributions to the effort. The band recorded this take live in the studio, with the sax of Clarence Clemons the only horn present. Southside Johnny used the E Street Band base recording for the title track of the Jukes' 1978 album, adding his vocal and the Miami Horns to create one of their best known songs. In 1998, Bruce had a horn section (Cruz-Manion-Pender-Rosenberg-Spengler) added to the 1977 recording, which was V2 on Tracks.

HOLD ON (TO WHAT YOU GOT) uncirculating

Note: Recorded at The Hit Factory in January or February 1982. Probably the same core recording as found on the U.S. Bonds album (i.e. the E Street Band) – but with the Springsteen lead vocal.

HOMESTEAD - V1 4:14 SA
HOMESTEAD - V2 4:11 GUEST: BABYLON

Note: Co-written by Springsteen and Joe Grushecky at Thrill Hill Recording, Beverly Hills, California, in late 1993. Recorded by Joe Grushecky at the Hit Factory, New York during November 1993. Released on American Babylon album in October 1995. Springsteen's version surfaced in November 2013, broadcast on E Street Radio.

HYMN TO HIM 4:30 GUEST: BLUES / 2020 single

Note: The original version of "Hymn To Him" was recorded for Dion's 1987 gospel album Velvet & Steel. As songs are never finished, Dion kept hearing it with Patti's voice, and he asked her to help remake the song. Bruce joined in the studio with his guitar and played a solo.

I'M NOT SLEEPING uncirculating
I'M NOT SLEEPING 3:56 GUEST: HOME

Note: Co-written by Springsteen and Joe Grushecky in July 1995 and released by Grushecky on the album Coming Home on February 10, 1998, without the presence of Bruce Springsteen. Springsteen first performed the song live on November 4, 2010, with Joe Grushecky and The Houserockers.

IDIOT'S DELIGHT - V1 3:58 GUEST: HOME
IDIOT'S DELIGHT - V2 3:22 ESR

Note: Co-written by Springsteen and Joe Grushecky in July 1995 and first released by Grushecky on the album Coming Home on February 10, 1998. Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band V2 first broadcast during episode five of 'From His Home To Yours' on E Street Radio on June 3, 2020.

JOLÉ BLON - V1 4:44 LM-13
JOLÉ BLON - V2 1:29 LM-13
JOLÉ BLON - V3 3:44 LM-13
JOLÉ BLON - V4 uncirculating
JOLÉ BLON - V5 3:25 GUEST: DEDICATION

Note: Based on a traditional Cajun waltz and adapted by Springsteen from Roy Acuff and his Smoky Mountain Boys' 1947 recording. The song was a big hit for the first time in 1947 for Harry Choates (recorded in 1946), and also for Red Foley & the Cumberland Valley Boys, who had a no. 1 Folk hit (formerly referred to as Hillbilly and by 1958 Country & Western charts) in January 1947 with "New Jolé Blon", and again a year later for Moon Mullican. "Jolé Blon" ("Pretty Blonde") was considered for the album once it became a two-LP set. V1–V3 are from Telegraph Hill rehearsals on January 11, 1980. V4 was recorded at Power Station studios on January 14, 1980, and the backing track may have been used by Gary U.S. Bonds on his 1981 album Dedication. V5 is the duet recorded with Bonds for Dedication.

LITTLE GIRL OF MINE - V1 uncirculating
LITTLE GIRL OF MINE GUEST: EARLY
LITTLE GIRL SO FINE - V2 uncirculating
LITTLE GIRL SO FINE GUEST: REAL

Note: V1 by Bruce Springsteen 1976. V2 co-written by Springsteen and Jukes producer "Sugar" Miami Steve Van Zandt in December 1976 during sessions for Southside Johnny's second album (released April 2, 1977). Not in the studio logs for Darkness On The Edge Of Town, which started after This Time It's For Real was released. Early title was "Little Girl Of Mine", which can be heard in a rehearsal take by Van Zandt recorded in late 1976, and released on his 2019 album, The Early Work. Though the track is now named "Little Girl So Fine", the final hook, title and lyric had yet to be composed, as evidenced by the refrain with the early title. Springsteen included "Little Girl Of Mine" V1 on an early 1976 list for Album IV; it could be this song, or another composition with the same title.

LOVE ON THE WRONG SIDE OF TOWN uncirculating

Note: Co-written by Springsteen (responsible for the main riff) and Van Zandt (the rest of the song) in December 1976 during sessions for Southside Johnny's second album, This Time It's For Real, released April 2, 1977. Rumored to be among the tracks recorded by Ronnie Spector and the E Street Band in January 1977, during sessions produced by "Sugar Miami" Steve Van Zandt. A rehearsal take by Van Zandt, recorded at the Stone Pony in January 1977, was released on his 2019 album, The Early Work. No evidence of Bruce Springsteen recording it during sessions for Darkness On The Edge Of Town.

LOVE'S ON THE LINE uncirculating

Note: Recorded at The Hit Factory in January or February 1982. Probably the same core recording as found on the U.S. Bonds album (i.e. the E Street Band) – but with the Springsteen lead vocal.

NOW AND FOREVER - V1 uncirculating
SUMMER ON SIGNAL HILL - V2 uncirculating

Note: "Summer On Signal Hill" was recorded as an instrumental by Clarence Clemons & The Red Bank Rockers at the Record Plant, New York, in 1983, the same sessions that produced "Savin' Up". Both tracks were produced by Bruce Springsteen, and released as a UK single, with "Summer On Signal Hill" the b-side. Springsteen's music publisher in Australia was accidentally sent the wrong information, so Clarence's instrumental was published and released there in 1983 as "Now And Forever", which was its original title. It was composed by Springsteen, with lyrics, and played during band rehearsals in April 1982, at his home studio in Colts Neck, New Jersey. Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band may have recorded it in the spring of 1983 at The Hit Factory in New York City, but it does not appear in Sony's database of Springsteen recording sessions. It was also recorded and released by Killer Joe on their 1991 album Scene Of The Crime. Moreover, Max Weinberg stated that "the E Street Band played the song but never recorded it" in the liner notes for that album.

OUT OF WORK uncirculating

Note: Recorded at The Hit Factory in January or February 1982. Probably the same core recording as found on the U.S. Bonds album (i.e. the E Street Band) – but with the Springsteen lead vocal.

SAVIN' UP uncirculating

Note: Recorded at The Hit Factory on January 25 and/or February 23, 1982. Song considered for Gary U.S. Bonds but not used – donated in 1983 to Clarence Clemons & The Red Bank Rockers for their debut album.

STREET HASSLE 11:00 GUEST: HASSLE

Around September or October 1977, Lou Reed found himself working at Record Plant studios, trying to complete "Street Hassle". At the same time, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band were hard at work in a studio downstairs, recording album #4. There are multiple narratives on what happened next, but Rod O'Brien, Reed's engineer, recalls working on the "Slipaway" section of the song. After Reed recorded "this thing, I hit the talkback, and I said, 'Uh. You realize what you just stole?' And Lou, deadpan, said, 'Whaddaya mean?' And then he started to crack up laughing. Then Lou says, 'But I gotta use it.' I said, 'Okay, but let’s go downstairs.' I said to Bruce, 'Lou wants to play you something, he just wants to make sure that you're not going to be upset.' So Bruce says, 'Okay,' and he comes up, and we play him the piece, and he says 'Oh, that's fine that's no problem…' And then Lou looks at him, and I didn't know Lou was going to do this, but he says: 'Would you do it?' And Bruce is like, '…what, me?' Lou says, 'Yeah.' And Bruce says, 'Okay, but you can't put my name on it, because I don't want to go through all the hassles that would mean…' And Lou's like, 'No problem.' So, Lou wrote the little part out, and as far as I remember, Bruce went out and did it one take." For more information on Springsteen and Reed, see the recording session listing.

TALK TO ME - V1a 3:59 LM-2 / DO-1 / ATEOD / AM
TALK TO ME - V1b 4:05 DDO / DDOC / UP
TALK TO ME - V2 uncirculating
TALK TO ME - V3 4:17 PROMISE
TALK TO ME - V4 uncirculating

Note: V1a and V1b of "Talk To Me" were recorded on July 8 or 13, 1977 at Atlantic Studios. Both are basic backing tracks without vocals or horns, which were not added, along with the lyrics, until August. On August 5, one take (V2) was labeled as "Bruce's original master." This version was officially released on The Promise in 2010, with modern horns added, featuring original Jukes/Miami Horns members Rick Gazda on trumpet, Stan Harrison on tenor sax, Ed Manion on baritone sax, Bob Muckin on trumpet, and Richie "La Bamba" Rosenberg on trombone (V3).

Additional sessions at either Atlantic Studios or The Record Plant (details unknown) occurred on August 9, 24, 26, and 30. After a final session on October 14, 1977, engineer Thom Panunzio dubbed "Hearts Of Stone" and "Talk To Me" to cassette for Steve Van Zandt, producer of Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes' third album. A note written by Panunzio is reproduced in 2010's The Promise: The Darkness on the Edge of Town Story. During 1978 sessions at Secret Sound Studios, Van Zandt combined the base rhythm track from the tape with Southside's vocals, brass by the Miami Horns, and his own lead guitar.

note_song_heartsofstone-talktome.jpg

Hearts Of Stone by Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes (Epic JE 35488), released October 13, 1978, ranks on several polls, including Rolling Stone's, as one of the best albums of the 1970s. According to Max Weinberg, who played on both Darkness On The Edge Of Town and Hearts Of Stone, the E Street Band backing tracks included on Steve's tape were utilized for Southside Johnny's album.

THAT'S WHAT MAKES US GREAT 3:26 GUEST: YESTERDAYS / 2017 single

Note: "That's What Makes Us Great" was composed by Joe Grushecky, and features a guest appearance by Bruce Springsteen on duet vocals. Bruce recorded his parts at his home studio in Colts Neck, New Jersey in February 2017. The song debuted on Sirius XM's E Street Radio channel on April 19, 2017.

THE FEVER 7:41 18TRACKS / FEVER / FS / RES / GT

Note: Written in late 1971, as evidenced by a dated lyric sheet titled "(I Got The) Fever For The Girl", on display at the Hard Rock Cafe, Sydney, Australia. It is believed the earliest known live performance was during a March 1973 residency at Oliver's in Boston, though rumors of 1972 performances exist. It was played live several more times into May. The studio version was recorded (in one take) on May 16, 1973 at 914 Sound Studios, though rumors have persisted for years that it dates from WGOE Studios, Richmond, VA on May 31. The recording features the Springsteen-Federici-Tallent-Clemons-Lopez lineup (pre-Sancious) and doesn't include any overdubs. Mike Appel requested the studio take for publishing purposes, and Laurel Canyon Publishing company registered it as "Fever For The Girl". "The Fever" was all but forgotten after it was recorded, dropped from the live set in mid-1973, and not included in any track sequences for album #2.

In late 1973, Appel and partner Jim Cretecos included it on an acetate of unreleased masters sent to UK Publisher Intersong Music. At the same time, cassettes of 7:41 track of "The Fever" were prepared, and sent to radio stations known to be supportive of young Springsteen's music, a rather short list. However, the song became an underground hit in places like Houston, Phoenix, and Boston. In Philadelphia, according to a listener, "the song exploded!" With vigorous backing by influential Philly DJ and Bruce fan Ed Sciaky, the song was played on WMMR as part of their regular rotation. Meanwhile, the publishing acetate fell into the hands of bootleggers, and soon "Fever" and "Resurrected" were being sold under the counter at record stores.

"The Fever" became a legendary '70s progressive FM-radio hit, but nowhere as big as in Houston, Texas, thanks to the March 1974 Liberty Hall shows, and several radio broadcasts. After an interview by KLOL-FM's Ed Beauchamp on March 8, Springsteen was invited back the next day with the E Street Band, for a lengthy afternoon radio performance that included highlights from both his albums, plus a rendition of "The Fever". That night at Liberty Hall, a fan yelled for "The Fever" and Bruce responded with "it's a weird thing, "The Fever"… that song "Fever" we did as a demo tape about a year ago… and Mike here… sent it down to just this radio station, you know…and it's a song we never even did but, uh, like, we did it on the radio today, but I promise if we'll come back, we'll work it up for you." At the late show the next day, Springsteen introduced the song by saying: "We're gonna try something now, this is a song we haven't done in about a year but we found out that they sent a demo down here…we're gonna give it a try for you, hope we'll remember…it's a song we did about a year ago, no, we did it when we were recording the second album…they sent the tape down here and I guess KLOF has been playing it you know…who?…is that wrong? Sorry, folks but whoever, the radio station." David Sancious later said he had been under the impression it was an old Sam Cooke classic.

After the band left Texas, "The Fever" was not played again live until they returned on July 14, 1978 in San Antonio. Springsteen had "gifted" the song to his friend Southside Johnny in December 1975 for his debut album, so he no longer considered it for his setlists. But his hardcore fans had other ideas, persuading him to play it on the Darkness Tour in many cities because, according to Bruce, "people would jump onstage and grab me by the head and scream, 'Bruce! Fever!'" It was played at Sam Houston Coliseum in Houston the next evening, and twenty-two more times to the end of the Darkness Tour. Though he joined Southside Johnny for duets many times, it was not released or played by Springsteen for the next 20 years. In 1998, a huge uproar ensued when it was omitted from //Tracks, leading to its official release on 18 Tracks the following year. The fans have made "The Fever" one of Springsteen's greatest lost classics. It has also become Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes' greatest hit, performed over 1,000 times since 1976.

In early 1977, a bootleg 7" demo (the studio take from 1973) of "The Fever" was released on "Bruce Records", coupled with "Rendezvous", recorded live on November 4, 1976, at the Palladium, New York, which opens with Bruce calling out "New York! Go ahead, Max!" In 1979, The Pointer Sisters recorded the song under the title "(She Got) The Fever", for their album Priority. The song was part of the soundtrack to the 2007 film Lucky You.

THIS LITTLE GIRL uncirculating

Note: Recorded at Power Station studios, possibly in late January 1980, and in June to August 1980 during sessions for Gary U.S. Bonds. A Springsteen vocal rendition from these sessions is likely to exist. "This Little Girl" became Bonds's biggest hit after release in 1981.

TRAPPED AGAIN uncirculating

Note: Co-written by Southside Johnny, Springsteen and Van Zandt in early 1978 during sessions for Southside Johnny’s third album. According to Southside he predominantly wrote the song, with Bruce and Steve merely adding bits and pieces. So a Springsteen studio recording of this song is highly unlikely to exist.

YOUR LOVE uncirculating

Note: Recorded at Power Station Studios in late 1980 before or during sessions for Gary U.S. Bonds. A Springsteen vocal rendition from these sessions is likely to exist.

WORKIN' ON IT uncirculating

Note: Recorded at The Hit Factory on January 25, 1982. An uncirculated song from the same session that gave us "Cover Me" and the Gary U.S. Bonds tracks.

WE ARE THE WORLD 7:02 GUEST: WORLD
WE ARE THE WORLD 6:22 1985 single

Note: After "Do They Know It's Christmas" was released in late 1984, veteran singer Harry Belafonte asked why American performers weren't doing something similar. Just before Christmas, Belafonte called his manager Ken Kragen, who handled such stars as Lionel Richie and Kenny Rogers. They contacted several musicians before it was agreed that Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie would write the song. Bruce Springsteen also agreed to participate, and according to Kragen, "The turning point was Bruce Springsteen's commitment, that legitimized the project in the eyes of the rock community." Once Kragen could tell other artists that Bruce was in, there were so many offers to sing that some were turned down. According to Quincy Jones, Springsteen's first reaction to the project was, "You sure you really want me to do this?" Richie and Jackson started writing "We Are The World" January 12, 1985, completing it on January 21, the night before sessions began. Michael provided the initial draft, then Lionel polished the structure and lyrics. The following evening, Richie, Jackson, Stevie Wonder, and producer Jones started work at Kenny Rogers's Lion Share Recording Studio in Los Angeles. Session musicians, engineers, video crews and other support staff were already on hand. Richie and Jackson recorded a guide vocal, and along with Stevie, created the basic instrumental track. On January 24, Jones shipped the demo tape to all artists who would be involved in the recording. Springsteen landed at Los Angeles International Airport, rented a Corvette, and drove to A&M Studios in Hollywood. "I swear I walked out to the gate just as he was coming in," said an amazed Ken Kragen. "I was looking to see if there were any hangups out there, and in walked Bruce… by himself." He said, "What do you want me to do?" He spent the next few hours getting cozy in the control room with the Pointer Sisters, whom he used to be angry at for taking "Fire" to no. 2 in 1979, when he was still stuck at a peak of no. 23 ("Born To Run"). Now that "Dancing In The Dark" had evened the score, and they were looking sexy and cute in person, that hatchet was buried without a doubt. He barely had time to nod to Bob Dylan and Billy Joel. By ten thirty everyone was there, the cameras were rolling, and Jones was ready to begin. Bruce never sang more than two nights running, because his concerts simply took too much out of him to do more. The two shows in Syracuse were more strenuous than average, and on this, the third night in a row, his voice was raw. Springsteen was a soloist, a had a duet with Wonder. By the time they got to his spot it was 5:30 in the morning. "You sounded fantastic, Dylan," he called to the man who'd just finished, then stepped to the mic. Dylan, Bette Midler, and a few others remained to watch him work. Sticking his sheet music in his back pocket, he wailed, "We are the world, we are the children," and according to Dave Marsh, "blew everyone away." Later, with his voice dubbed into a duet with Wonder's, the same line provided the single's climax. Finishing that first take, Springsteen looked up shyly. "Something like that?" he asked. Quincy Jones had to laugh. "Exactly like that," he said. The song was released on March 7, 1985, as the first single from the album. The estimated global sales of "We Are The World" exceed 20 million units, the biggest selling single in both US and pop music history.
See recording page for more details.

WE'VE GOT THE LOVE 4:20 GUEST: JAM / 1986 single

Note: Late in 1985, after the conclusion of The Born In The U.S.A. Tour, Garry Tallent and Tim Ryan organized a large group of New Jersey musicians to raise money for charity to fight hunger, inspired by projects like, "USA For Africa". They created a non-profit organization called Jersey Artists For Mankind (a.k.a. J.A.M. '86), then invited representatives from bands based in New Jersey to sing two songs that had been prepared. "We've Got The Love", composed by Joel Krauss and Bob Bandiera, and "Save Love, Save Life", by Ryan and Ed Testa, had been previously chosen, and a core group of musicians had recorded the base tracks. After a brief rehearsal, more than 450 artists recorded their parts at The Stone Pony, Asbury Park, New Jersey, on January 13, 1986, the largest gathering of New Jersey rock artists ever. Vocal solos were contributed by Krauss, Bandiera, Southside Johnny Lyon, former Castile George Theiss, and many others. The "J.A.M. Band" assembled included Bandiera on guitar, drummers Max Weinberg and Ernest "Boom" Carter, and a horn section dominated by Richie "La Bamba" Rosenberg, along with the rest of the Jukes horns. Instrumental solos were performed by an all-star cast, led by Clarence Clemons and guitarist Bruce Springsteen, who tried his best to concentrate on his craft, despite what sounded like booing from those present, until everybody realized it was his first name being shouted by enthusiastic well-wishers. "We've Got The Love" was mixed by Bob Clearmountain, and "Save Love, Save Life" by Bob Cohen. Engineer was Jan Topoleski.

WHEN YOU DANCE 13:35 UBER26

Note: Written by Bruce Springsteen and Steve Van Zandt in 1971 and performed regularly until early 1972. Along with "Jambalaya", this was Bruce's most frequently utilized show-closer during the period. Several live performances are in circulation. However, the most outstanding version (by far) is the studio rehearsal version recorded at Challenger Eastern Surfboards, Highlands, NJ on March 14, 1972. When he was producing Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes' second album, This Time It's For Real, in early 1977, Steve wrote an arrangement for the ten-piece brass dominated group that was utilized as the closing track on side two, and played live often on their subsequent tour. A rehearsal take by Van Zandt, recorded in December 1976, was released on his 2019 album, The Early Work.

YOU MEAN SO MUCH TO ME DDITV / ESRR / MT1 / UBER22

Note: Written in early 1971 as "When She Sings To Me"; title was changed to "You Mean So Much To Me" later in the year. Bruce introduced the song as "When She Sings To Me" in July 1971. Rehearsed at Challenger East Surfboard Factory, though apparently not on the evening of March 14, 1972, because it was absent from the tapes recorded by Tinker West. It was performed throughout 1971, although the circulating live versions mostly stem from the middle months. First caught on tape July 10, 1971 by The Bruce Springsteen Band. Another song that would be ranked in the top tier of Springsteen's pre-CBS portfolio. Bruce obviously felt this was one of his best early creations, as he continued to perform it live (in an acoustical arrangement) regularly throughout 1973 and 1974. There are no records of it being recorded at 914 Sound Studios for Greetings or The Wild, The Innocent, but many undocumented sessions are known to exist during mid-1973, held between 12 midnight and dawn, to avoid having to pay the studio. It is likely most of the base tracks for The Wild were recorded in mid-June 1973 in this fashion, and would explain why most of that information is also missing. However, perhaps the biggest mystery is how the money-conscious Mike Appel and his partner Jimmy Cretecos could fail to record a demo for publishing purposes, unless they used the May 31, 1973 WGOE broadcast tape. Never officially released by Springsteen, it was first bootlegged on 'Deep Down In The Vaults' in the 1990s. In late 1975, Steve Van Zandt and Bruce Springsteen decided to get their friend John Lyon and his band Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes a contract and record an album. Bruce helped out by donating two of his compositions to the effort, "You Mean So Much To Me" and "The Fever". At the Record Plant one day, he ran into Ronnie Spector, who had been invited by Van Zandt. Inspired, he quickly wrote an arrangement for "You Mean So Much To Me" as a duet for Ronnie and Southside Johnny (borrowing from his BSB days), which became the closing song on side 2 of the Jukes' debut album, I Don't Want To Go Home. Ronnie agreed to tour with the Jukes throughout 1976–1977, and their duet was a regular encore and show closer.


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