Steel Mill - Studio Sessions - Details

Details

AIN'T GONNA LOSE IT THIS TIME studio version uncirculating

Note: Steel Mill -era composition, confirmed from a finished lyric sheet. No known live performance.

ALL I WANNA KNOW studio version uncirculating

Note: Steel Mill -era composition, confirmed from a finished lyric sheet. No known live performance.

AMERICA UNDER FIRE studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 and performed in concert regularly during the second half of 1969 and up through mid-1970. Bruce’s nickname for this one was “American Song”. It is also known as “American Tune”. A couple of live performances are in circulation.

AMPLIFIER BLUES studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 and performed in concert during 1969 and early 1970. Also known as “Fucked Up Amplifier Blues”.

BLACK SUN RISING studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in early 1970 and performed in concert during 1970. One of the better Springsteen compositions of the Steel Mill era.

CALIFORNIA BLUES studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in early 1970, either during or immediately following Steel Mill’s trip to San Francisco. Performed in concert during the first half of 1970.

CHANGING CHILDREN studio version uncirculating

Note: Written mid-1970 and a regular concert inclusion during the Robbin Thompson era of Steel Mill (September 70 – January 71). Sometimes listed under the title “Change It (Revolution)” or "Change It".

COME ON studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in late 1969 and performed in concert up through mid 1970. A couple of live performances are in circulation. Sometimes listed under the title “Come On (The World Is Crying For Freedom)”.

WE'VE GOT TO DO IT NOW studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in mid or late 1970. Only one live performance is known, from recently circulating audio from The Sunshine In on November 27, 1970. Also known as "Do It Now".

FIRE ENGINES ARE RETURNING HOME studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 during the Child period and probably performed live in 1969. There is no audio performance in circulation. A finished lyric sheet, complete with Bruce’s chord notations, exists.

FREAK II studio version uncirculating

Note: An instrumental written in 1969 or 1970 of which little is known. Bruce’s handwritten title/chord progression sheet has recently surfaced. It is not known if another instrumental called “Freak I” was also composed.

GARDEN STATE PARKWAY BLUES studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 or early 1970 and performed in concert up through mid 1970. The title is deceptive as this is not blues but, rather, a suite of mini-songs linked together to convey an entire working day in the life of the character. Bruce sometimes referred to this by the title “The Alarm Clock Song”. A couple of live performances are in circulation, with one nearly 30 minutes in duration.

GOOD LOVIN' WOMAN studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1970. The only known live performance is from the Marshall Parking Deck show in August 1970.

GOIN' BACK TO GEORGIA 5:16 BSS3 / US1 / VAFH

Note: Written in 1969 and performed in concert regularly during 1969, 1970 and even occasionally during the 1971 Bruce Springsteen Band era. This unabashed Allman Brothers-influenced tune was the third most requested song of the Steel Mill era, behind “Resurrection” and “Guilty”. Several live performances are in circulating. One of three songs recorded at Pacific Recording Studio, San Mateo, CA on February 22, 1970.

HE'S GUILTY (THE JUDGE SONG) 5:57 BSS3 / US1 / VAFH
HE'S GUILTY (THE JUDGE SONG) 4:39 CHAPTER

Note: Written in the summer of 1969 and performed in concert regularly during the second half of 1969 and throughout 1970. After Robbin Thompson joined the band the song tended to be slotted into the final stages of the show. Several live performances are in circulation. One of three songs recorded at Pacific Recording Studio, San Mateo, CA on February 22, 1970 and officially released in September 2016 on Chapter And Verse, the companion album to Springsteen's autobiography Born To Run. This version has been edited, reducing the length to 4:39 by cutting some of the instrumental segments short. Former Steel Mill vocalist Robbin Thompson released a cover version in 1986. Sometimes listed as “Guilty” or “Send That Boy To Jail”.

I AM THE DOCTOR studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 and performed in concert often throughout 1970. A couple of live performances are circulating. No relation to Springsteen’s 1972 composition “Lady And The Doctor”.

I CAN'T TAKE IT studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in mid-1970 and a frequent concert inclusion during the September 70-January 71 Robbin Thompson era of Steel Mill. Several live performances are circulating. Sometimes listed under the title “I Can’t Take It No More”.

I JUST CAN'T THINK studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in early 1970. One verified live performance, on April 18, 1970, although there are likely to have been others.

JEANNIE I WANT TO THANK YOU studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 and performed in concert regularly during the second half of 1969 and into the early months of 1970. A couple of live performances are in circulation.

JENNIFER studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1968 or 1969 and performed in concert regularly throughout 1969. There is no audio performance in circulation. Apparently this is a soft ballad and may well be related to the “Jennifer” known via Laurel Canyon copyright documentation.

KT-88 studio version uncirculating

Note: An instrumental, written in late 1969 or early 1970 and played in concert up until mid 1970. A couple of live performances are in circulation. Allegedly a variation of this song was performed by Bruce and the E Street Band during a few shows early in the 1972-73 Greetings Tour, although there’s no audio or setlist verification.

LADY WALKING DOWN BY THE RIVER studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in the summer or fall of 1969 and performed in concert regularly during the second half of 1969 and into the early months of 1970. A couple of live performances are in circulation.

MARY LOUISE WATSON studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in late 1970. The earliest circulating audio performance is from a January 1971 Steel Mill show at D’Scene. This is one of the few Steel Mill-era songs that Bruce continued performing during the Bruce Springsteen Band period, as renditions from that period are also circulating. Sometimes referred to by the title “Mary Lou Watson” or “Black Widow Spider”.

OH MAMA studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in mid to late 1970 and a played often during the September 70 – January 71 Robbin Thompson era of Steel Mill. Sometimes listed under the title “Oh Mama Why”.

RESURRECTION studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 and performed in concert regularly during 1969 and 1970. This was always a heavily requested crowd favorite and was sometimes utilized in the encore slot. Bruce appears to have “retired” the song when Steel Mill disbanded in early 1971, as there are no confirmed later performances.

SHERLOCK GOES HOLME studio version uncirculating

Note: An instrumental composed in 1969 or early 1970. A couple of performances circulate from the early and middle months of 1970. Also known by the titles "Sherlock Goes Holmes" and "On The Tips”. Neither title may be the true title.

SISTER THERESA studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 and performed regularly during the Vinnie Roslyn era of Steel Mill but then only once in a while during 1970. Only one live audio performance is in circulation, from a gig in Richmond in late 69 (possibly early 1970). The alternate title spelling is “Sister Teresa”.

SOMETHING'S GOTTA BREAK studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 or early 1970 and performed until mid 1970. A live version recorded at the Ocean Ice Palace in June 1970 is in circulation.

SWEET MELINDA studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969, with documented performances taking place through early 1971. There are a couple of live renditions in circulation.

TEMPORARILY OUT OF ORDER studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 or early 1970 and performed until mid 1970. A couple of live versions are in circulation.

THE TRAIN SONG 6:31 BSS3 / US1 / VAFH

Note: Written in 1969. This is about as close to mainstream country as Springsteen has ever gotten – and out of character with Bruce’s other known compositions of the era. One of three songs recorded at Pacific Recording Studio, San Mateo, CA on February 22, 1970. Perhaps it was selected for that session in order to demonstrate the band’s versatility. The studio outtake is marred by a repetitious ending. Former Steel Mill vocalist Robbin Thompson has recorded and released a nice cover version. “The Train Song” should not be confused with “Train Ride”, a Robbin Thompson composition that was also performed by Steel Mill.

THE WAR IS OVER studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in the summer or fall of 1969 and performed in concert regularly during the second half of 1969 and into the early months of 1970. A couple of early 1970 live performances are in circulation.

WE'LL ALL MAN THE GUNS studio version uncirculating

Notes: Written in mid-1970 and among Bruce’s better Steel Mill compositions, with more expansive lyrics than any other documented Springsteen composition of the period. Bruce’s complete handwritten lyric sheet has surfaced. The only circulating audio performance is from Richmond’s Marshall Parking Deck gig in Aug 1970. Sometimes listed under the title “We’ll Man The Guns”.

WHERE WAS JESUS IN OHIO studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in May or June 1970. Bruce’s emotionally charged response to the Kent State University shootings on May 4th. Only one known live performance - in Richmond, sometime during May-July, 1970. An audience recording exists (as well as the audio of the entire show from which it emanates) - unfortunately this audio is not currently in mainstream circulation.

WHY'D YOU DO THAT studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in early 1970. A couple of live performances from 1970 are circulating.

THE WIND AND THE RAIN studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 or early 1970 and performed in concert frequently during 1970. If this is not Bruce’s finest Steel Mill-era composition, it’s certainly in the top two or three. A couple of live performances are in circulation from the middle months of 1970.

YOU SAY YOU LOVE ME studio version uncirculating

Note: Written in 1969 or early 1970. The only documented performance is from a gig in Richmond in February 1970. An audience recording exists of this show but it’s not currently in mainstream circulation.

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